July 11, 2016 Community Forum “A Healing Discussion on Race & America”

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro, NC community comes together to share, listen, grieve and comfort each other as they deal with their emotions and feelings about the July 2016  police shootings of two black men and the shooting deaths of five Dallas police officers.

2016 Racial Truth Justice and Reconciliation Covenant

At its 105th Annual Meeting on Sunday, June 5, 2016, the congregation of United Church of Chapel Hill, committed itself to a Racial Truth Justice and Reconciliation Covenant.

In 2008 the United Church of Chapel Hill began having Sacred Conversations on Race which blossomed into hosting two-day Racial Equity Institute workshops, having numerous Sunday school forums, participating in Moral Mondays, hosting the Rev. Dr. Jeremiah Wright, Pastor Emeritus of Trinity UCC, in Chicago, in September 2015 to speak and preach about racial justice and invited the Rev. Dr. John Dorhauer, General Minister and President of the United Church of Christ in April 2016 to speak and preach about white privilege.

One of the goals of this multi-year initiative was to craft a covenant that would serve not as a closing statement but as a promissory note for the new community United Church of Chapel Hill is becoming. In March 2016 the congregation was invited to a Saturday morning retreat to draft a covenant. The draft was then circulated to all the boards of the church before coming to the Church Council for approval prior to forwarding the covenant to the congregation. It was approved unanimously at the congregation’s 2016 Annual Meeting on June 5, 2016.

United Church of Chapel Hill is a member congregation of the United Church of Christ (UCC), a distinct and diverse community of Christians that come together as one church to join faith and action. The UCC is “a church of firsts:” first historically white denomination to ordain an African-American, the first to ordain a woman, the first to ordain an openly gay man, and the first Christian church to affirm the right of same-gender couples to marry. The United Church of Christ was in the forefront of the anti-slavery movement and the Civil Rights movement. The United Church of Christ is also a church that practices inclusion and radical hospitality with its campaign that “God is still speaking.”

  • Racial Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation Covenant

    Trusting in the grace of God that overflows with faith and love[1],
         we acknowledge that we have constructed and sustained the false concept of race,
    with systemic racism embedded in our nation, institutions, and selves.
    Therefore, we seek to transform ourselves, our church, and our world.

    Recognizing that God shows no partiality[2] and made us all of one blood[3],
         we confess that we
    use race to advantage some and disadvantage others,
    focus on individual prejudice rather than on unjust systems,
    perpetuate the oppression, legacy, and effects of racism
    through our indifference or complicity, and
    deny that overcoming racism is a spiritual struggle.
    Therefore, we recognize our need to be forgiven and to forgive.

    As Jesus did not count equality with God as something to be exploited but humbled himself[4],
         we commit
    to listen, learn, and walk in humility
    to better understand and repair the evils of racism.
    As we journey together, there is no one to whom
    we can say, ‘we have no need of you.[5]

    We appeal to you, brothers and sisters, do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God[6]
         With God’s help we covenant
    to continually,
    learn and speak the truth about racism,
    work for racial justice and equity,
    structure the common life of the United Church of Chapel Hill
    to embody the gifts of all,
    participate in the transformation of our racialized world and, in so doing,
    reconcile ourselves to God and to each other.

    We give thanks and praise to God for our redemption
    and the promise of our life together made new.
    _______

    [1] 1 Timothy 1:12-17
    [2] Acts 10:34
    [3] Acts 17:26, KJV
    [4] Philippians 3:1-8, passage in Paul lifts up the radical humility of Jesus
    [5] 1 Corinthians 12, passage in which Paul affirms the diversity of the community and the gifts of each and all
    [6] Romans 12:1-3

  • Racial Justice Workshop – April 23, 2016 with Reverend Dr. John Dorhauer

    Racial Justice Workshop April 23 & 24, 2016 with Reverend Dr. John Dorhauer

    Saturday, April 23 – Lecture Part 1

    Saturday, April 23 – Lecture Part 2

    Sunday, April 24 – Reverend John Dorhauer Sermon

  • Worship with Reverend D. Jeremiah Wright – Sunday, September 20, 2015

    Worship Services September 20 2015 – Reverend Dr. Jeremiah Wright

    Sunday, September 20 – 8:45 am Sermon

    Sunday, September 20 – 11 am Sermon

  • Racial Equity Workshops and Organizing Against Racism

    The Racial Equity Institute – Anti-Racism Workshops

    Race remains an important indicator of success in U.S. society. When other factors that are cited as the probable reasons for health or social problems (e.g., income, education, parent involvement, access to health insurance) are controlled for in statistical analyses, race remains an important independent predictor of health, social, education, criminal justice and other outcomes.

    The Anti-Racism training, delivered by the Racial Equity Institute, LL,C is designed to build the capacity of educators, health practitioners, child welfare advocates, judicial representatives, other professionals and others who are interested in understanding and eliminating racial inequities, disparities and dis-proportionality within our society. These workshops are important for people of color and white people who want to dismantle racism. It has often been said, “An organized truth is more powerful than a disorganized lie.” These workshops provide an analysis that helps participants gain clarity about how racism is well-organized and at work in our institutional practices.

    The Organizing Against Racism (OAR) network invites people to attend 2-day Racial Equity Institute (REI) Anti-Racism workshops held around the Triangle, including United Church.

 

July 11, 2016 Community Forum “A Healing Discussion on Race & America”

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro, NC community comes together to share, listen, grieve and comfort each other as they deal with their emotions and feelings about the July 2016  police shootings of two black men and the shooting deaths of five Dallas police officers.

2016 Racial Truth Justice and Reconciliation Covenant

At its 105th Annual Meeting on Sunday, June 5, 2016, the congregation of United Church of Chapel Hill, committed itself to a Racial Truth Justice and Reconciliation Covenant.

In 2008 the United Church of Chapel Hill began having Sacred Conversations on Race which blossomed into hosting two-day Racial Equity Institute workshops, having numerous Sunday school forums, participating in Moral Mondays, hosting the Rev. Dr. Jeremiah Wright, Pastor Emeritus of Trinity UCC, in Chicago, in September 2015 to speak and preach about racial justice and invited the Rev. Dr. John Dorhauer, General Minister and President of the United Church of Christ in April 2016 to speak and preach about white privilege.

One of the goals of this multi-year initiative was to craft a covenant that would serve not as a closing statement but as a promissory note for the new community United Church of Chapel Hill is becoming. In March 2016 the congregation was invited to a Saturday morning retreat to draft a covenant. The draft was then circulated to all the boards of the church before coming to the Church Council for approval prior to forwarding the covenant to the congregation. It was approved unanimously at the congregation’s 2016 Annual Meeting on June 5, 2016.

United Church of Chapel Hill is a member congregation of the United Church of Christ (UCC), a distinct and diverse community of Christians that come together as one church to join faith and action. The UCC is “a church of firsts:” first historically white denomination to ordain an African-American, the first to ordain a woman, the first to ordain an openly gay man, and the first Christian church to affirm the right of same-gender couples to marry. The United Church of Christ was in the forefront of the anti-slavery movement and the Civil Rights movement. The United Church of Christ is also a church that practices inclusion and radical hospitality with its campaign that “God is still speaking.”

  • Racial Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation Covenant

    Trusting in the grace of God that overflows with faith and love[1],
         we acknowledge that we have constructed and sustained the false concept of race,
    with systemic racism embedded in our nation, institutions, and selves.
    Therefore, we seek to transform ourselves, our church, and our world.

    Recognizing that God shows no partiality[2] and made us all of one blood[3],
         we confess that we
    use race to advantage some and disadvantage others,
    focus on individual prejudice rather than on unjust systems,
    perpetuate the oppression, legacy, and effects of racism
    through our indifference or complicity, and
    deny that overcoming racism is a spiritual struggle.
    Therefore, we recognize our need to be forgiven and to forgive.

    As Jesus did not count equality with God as something to be exploited but humbled himself[4],
         we commit
    to listen, learn, and walk in humility
    to better understand and repair the evils of racism.
    As we journey together, there is no one to whom
    we can say, ‘we have no need of you.[5]

    We appeal to you, brothers and sisters, do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God[6]
         With God’s help we covenant
    to continually,
    learn and speak the truth about racism,
    work for racial justice and equity,
    structure the common life of the United Church of Chapel Hill
    to embody the gifts of all,
    participate in the transformation of our racialized world and, in so doing,
    reconcile ourselves to God and to each other.

    We give thanks and praise to God for our redemption
    and the promise of our life together made new.
    _______

    [1] 1 Timothy 1:12-17
    [2] Acts 10:34
    [3] Acts 17:26, KJV
    [4] Philippians 3:1-8, passage in Paul lifts up the radical humility of Jesus
    [5] 1 Corinthians 12, passage in which Paul affirms the diversity of the community and the gifts of each and all
    [6] Romans 12:1-3

  • Racial Justice Workshop – April 23, 2016 with Reverend Dr. John Dorhauer

    Racial Justice Workshop April 23 & 24, 2016 with Reverend Dr. John Dorhauer

    Saturday, April 23 – Lecture Part 1

    Saturday, April 23 – Lecture Part 2

    Sunday, April 24 – Reverend John Dorhauer Sermon

  • Worship with Reverend D. Jeremiah Wright – Sunday, September 20, 2015

    Worship Services September 20 2015 – Reverend Dr. Jeremiah Wright

    Sunday, September 20 – 8:45 am Sermon

    Sunday, September 20 – 11 am Sermon

  • Racial Equity Workshops and Organizing Against Racism

    The Racial Equity Institute – Anti-Racism Workshops

    Race remains an important indicator of success in U.S. society. When other factors that are cited as the probable reasons for health or social problems (e.g., income, education, parent involvement, access to health insurance) are controlled for in statistical analyses, race remains an important independent predictor of health, social, education, criminal justice and other outcomes.

    The Anti-Racism training, delivered by the Racial Equity Institute, LL,C is designed to build the capacity of educators, health practitioners, child welfare advocates, judicial representatives, other professionals and others who are interested in understanding and eliminating racial inequities, disparities and dis-proportionality within our society. These workshops are important for people of color and white people who want to dismantle racism. It has often been said, “An organized truth is more powerful than a disorganized lie.” These workshops provide an analysis that helps participants gain clarity about how racism is well-organized and at work in our institutional practices.

    The Organizing Against Racism (OAR) network invites people to attend 2-day Racial Equity Institute (REI) Anti-Racism workshops held around the Triangle, including United Church.